BRIDGES

We are pausing on a bridge
over the dwindling stream
that crawls through our large,
local dollop of green, Bird Park,

because we always pause, she and I,
on every little bridge
that spans any river anywhere,

so she can look down
from first one side,
then the other,
at that liquid light
which is water in the daytime,

one of many rituals
that string our days and months
together
like a prayer flag.

I watch her watching water,
wondering if she notices
how much thinner the stream
than just last week,

and my ear goes towards the toddler
just arrived and
tumbling in the grass nearby,
which calls my gaze there, too.

The child laughs and spins
as her female loving presence-
Mother, Nanny—tosses a little pink ball.

Too quickly to stop,
ball is rolling into stream.
Just as fast,
the child’s laughter turns to wails,
improbably huge, garish sounds
from such a small body,

and my gaze shifts back to daughter,
who is now squinting,
now covering her ears,
turning away from bridge and water
and back towards the safety of the path
leading away from wailing child.

Now daughter is tense,
and each person, each dog we pass
might be a reason to become undone,
an insult to the tightly wound
system of nerves and cellular memories
ticking in linear, illogical time

and I think of all of us,
everywhere,
living with and without Autism,
carrying years of triggers,
a hundred reasons to become undone,

and how we are each,
at any given hour, maybe
a few breaths away from meltdown,

and the marvel is
how we hold it together,
or pretend to,
in a time when mass shootings
are just a few more storms
punctuating the news cycle,
and everything seems cracked,
precarious.

We find the safety of the car,
she and I,
and an hour later she is
singing in the market,
luscious bluesy notes
in perfect pitch,

and my own triggers recede,
and I think yes,
yes, this is how we go on.

This is how we’ll go on.

 

-Melinda Coppola

 

 

WHO WILL SING? Autism, Adulthood, and Home

Bink and the big, wide sea

 

WHO WILL SING?

She gets older, this daughter of mine,
as do I, and the heavy question behind
each day, and woven now into each year:
what about when I’m gone?

She can’t live with you forever
I’m told, and I know this to be true.
Some of her peers, twenty-ish,
thirty-ish, middle aged,
have gone to group homes,
happily or not so,

and still the world spins,
and more questions arise,
for the options aren’t
pretty or plentiful,
and my imaginings vacillate
between dark and bleak.

Who will sing to her, mornings,
and guard the rituals
that define her boundaries?

There are the questions she asks
of songs, or objects, or days,
or other people, some of them dead,
some she has no contact with,
and I am to answer them
as if I am that person, that thing,
ten a week, typed up by Friday at 3pm.

There is the morning question or statement, often cryptic,
and she anxiously awaits my videotaped response,
though I am in the same room.

There is the crucial, long enough pause
between activities,
the deciphering of scrawled dreams,
decoding her language
in time to understand
she means This
and not That,

planning the next day’s snack,
next week’s lunch,
offering the hair,
two sided and girl shaped,

reminding and re-answering
a hundred times a day,
why him and not her,
why people say this,
do that,

what it means to advocate
in front of people,
in real time,
rather than to the air,
in a corner, hours later?

You say
she will adjust.
You say
she will deal,
must learn to cope,

and if I weren’t so damned appropriate
I’d ask you what it would be like
if someone took control of your every activity
because it’s easier that way,
(for them),
because they don’t understand
what you need,
because there are four or five others
living with you
who need things too,

what if the notes, the records,
the story of your life,
were left in a drawer somewhere,
unread, or read only once
by a supervisor
in an office somewhere,
and

what would it be like
if your clothes were too
rough against your skin,
and you didn’t have the words,
or, if you did,
they came out a month, a year later,
and so you had to wear these garments
that sandpapered your tender flesh

and then when you scratched your arms
til you bled,
what if you were given
a behavioral plan to curb
that thing you were doing to cope?

I’d ask you what it would be like
if the proverbial walls of your house ,
the very things you count on
to be there, day after day,
your schedule, your calendar,
your To-Do list,
were erased one day,
and the people you count on,
let’s call them staff,
changed every few months,
and didn’t read the notes about you,
or forgot what was in them,

and you were expected to be compliant,
do as you’re told,
and deal with it,
even if you didn’t like
the food you were given,
the activities you were driven to,
the staff who you relied on
for food, for a bath,
the others who shared the place
you are now supposed to call home?

Too attached, you say?
Am I melodramatic, or just well read?

You do the research,
ask around,
go check out the houses
you say she should live in,
be the fly on the wall,
and the report back to me, please.

I distract myself
with the gifts, the burdens,
the details of her life.
Tea too hot,
song too rough,,
packed lunch was uninteresting,
everything needs more salt.

In the land of Autism
the tiniest thing
can make or break a day,

and when it breaks—
the day, or my heart—
when it breaks
the healing is slow, uneven,
and the memory of every assault
on the nervous system,
hers or mine,
seems imprinted on the walls
of her cells, of this place
she calls her home,

but here we incorporate it into the décor,
write poems about it,
scratch an itch against the rough
patch in the plaster.

We make it all right.

All right then,
Tell me true—
Who will sing to her
When I’m gone,
Who will sing?

 

-Melinda Coppola

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7 AM ( more autism awareness)

7am

I entered your room quietly,
with loving stealth,
stood inches from where you slept
curled into the warmth of your sleep nest,
pausing one round moment
to take in the sight of you, just
to hug you with my eyes
before we began
the ritual we’d perfected over
twenty four years of mornings.

There we were
in our assigned places,
me leaning gently above,
you just beginning to stir
as I sang you awake.
There were your hands
reaching for my hair,
first right side then left,
like always, like a touchstone
to remind you it’s safe
to be awake and alive.

Pink walls and ceiling, pastel rug,
whispered, made-up song,
you under soft
layers of things;
assorted spreads, a quilt, some blankets,
one embroidered with your name
and the date you debuted,
a gift at birth from a relative
on your now absent
dad’s side that met you
once maybe, whose name
I’ve quite forgotten,
who is surely long dead.

I flash-mused on what she’d feel,
this nameless giver of named blankets,
if she could ghost unseen
into your bedroom, this morning
to see what you’ve become.

Would it be grief
for all the ways you’ll never be,
the way you arrived
with unseen challenges,
diagnoses not yet named,
a baby who would remain,
in many ways, a child?

Would it be curiosity,
your differences intriguing,
offering perspectives
she’d never considered
while alive,
tapping on the doors
of her phantom compassion,
awakening a deep patience,
a human reunion with her own
estranged otherness,
the selves she, while living, shunned?

I hope she would be filled
with the color of pure delight
as she saw you still loving
her decades old gift,
for its essential pinkness,
its enduring softness,
its well-named comfort
in the place you call safe,
in the place you dream,
in the place you are perfect
with no one there
to tell you otherwise,
in the place you dream.

-Melinda Coppola

I’m just the messenger

Lurleen Lumpkin, from The Simpsons

 

Sometimes, it’s a struggle to write. Lots of sometimes. There’s so much inside that wants to come out! So, picture this: I’m at my desk, all serious-like, trying to hone words into pictures, to allow the pen to move and accept what comes without judgement, and then to be brave and put it out there for you to (hopefully) read. I’m kind of hunched over in a very un-Yogic way. My brow is probably furrowed. And then this, …this stream of country western song lyrics comes pouring forth! I mean, I’ve always wanted to learn to play guitar, but this??  So, after my laughter died down a bit, I sat up straight, took a deep breath, and put it into this blog post. The Muse may have called the wrong number, but who am I to hang up the phone?

 

LAST NIGHT THE WIND

It was blowing and moaning and
(I imagine)
Singing and lowing and
( I believe)
weaving it’s way into and through
any old regrets I’ve had about you
What’s a grown woman to do?
Last night the wind
had me singing along, stringing along
my old Pollyanna-ly ways
Last night the wind
had me winging and winging
til my arms felt they’d burst
with me bringing and bringing
the news of some positive positive shift
the news of some mighty big changes.

When all’s said and done,
life rearranges and don’t we adapt or
we die? Sometimes
we adapt and that means something ends
as a means to an end, so
can’t we allow
The wind to go blowing and moaning
singing and lowing and
weaving it’s way into and into and through
Removing old regrets I once had about you
Goodbye old regrets about you

 

Melinda Coppola